Get the facts about the Federal Work-Study Program - Student Research Foundation

Four Things Students Need to Remember about the Federal Work-Study Program

Chances are you have heard rumors that the Federal Work-Study will soon be canceled, due to coming government cuts in funding to college education. At the time we publish this post, those rumors seem to be nothing more than rumors, and it seems that the Federal Work-Study program is not under direct fire.

That’s the good news. But even so, we would like to utilize today’s post to dispel some common misconceptions about what the Work-Study Program is and how it works.

The Money Students Earn Will Not Hurt Them When They File the FAFSA

This point causes confusion. Although students do need to list the income they earned through the Work-Study program on the FAFSA, those earnings will not cause them to receive less Federal assistance. So students should not worry that participating in the Work-Study program will disqualify them from applying for Government-funded loans. The Work-Study money they earn is essentially exempt income.

The Work-Study Program Does Not Place Students in Jobs

After a student is approved to take part, it only means that the Federal government will provide funds to subsidize the pay that a student earns while in school. After a student is accepted into the program, it is up to him or her to find an employer who takes part in the Work-Study program. College counseling offices are generally able to connect students with participating jobs.

Students Must Re-Apply Every Year

Neither participation in the program nor individual jobs automatically carry over from one year to the next. If you are a student who is taking part in the program or if you counsel students who are, remember that a new application must be filed each year.

Students Still Need to Manage the Money They Earn

The money earned is not automatically applied to tuition. Students will be paid for the jobs they work as part of the program and must manage that money just as they would manage income from any other source.

To Learn More . . .

Visit studentaid.ed.gov

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